Occupiers Demonstrate . . . What’s Wrong With Self-Esteem Education

Occupy Protesters are laying the groundwork to create chaos in Tampa during the Republican National Convention in August.

Tampa residents need to be aware of the ways these professional activists are costing us money.  Frivolous confrontations and false accusations against the police are just the first items on the price tag for their planned temper tantrum.  I hope the city and the county show the gumption to send the bill to these activists.  The Occupiers are raising plenty of money: the fact that they’re keeping their books like some money-laundering pizzaria shouldn’t let them off the dough hook (I can say this because I once worked at a money-laundering pizzaria).  Elected officials owe it to taxpayers to sue the non-profit entities through which these protesters are collecting donations. ... 

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“Grassroots” Prisoner Strikes in California Actually Funded Directly by George Soros

The hunger strikes at several California prisons this summer may have seemed like spontaneous uprisings against torturous conditions.  That’s how many incurious souls in the fourth estate are portraying them.  To wit, this hand-wringing Washington Post editorial highlighting the “tragic modesty” of prisoner demands:

DOZENS OF INMATES at California’s Pelican Bay facility went on hunger strikes for several weeks this summer for what seemed like pitifully modest demands: “Allow one photo per year. Allow one phone call per week. Allow wall calendars.”  What would prompt such drastic measures in the quest for such modest goals? Answer: The protest was an exasperated and understandable reaction to the invisible brutality that is solitary confinement. Some of the Pelican Bay inmates have been held in “security housing units” for years; those tagged as gang members can expect to stay there for six years, with no certainty that they will be reintegrated into the general population even if they renounce gang membership.  When an inmate is holed up alone in a cell for up to 23 hours a day with no meaningful human contact, a photograph of a loved one or a weekly telephone call can help to forge a connection with the outside world. With little or no exposure to natural light, a calendar can help forestall losing all track of time, all sense of reality. These simple privileges, in short, can help ward off insanity. ... 

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