I read this Charlie LeDuff column last week in the Detroit News, and I just can’t get it out of my mind.  Think back to when you rode a bus to school.  Did you have to worry about not getting home?

Stand at Detroit’s most notorious bus stop at the northeastern intersection of the Southfield Freeway and Warren. This is the corner where seven children waiting for a bus were shot in an after-school rampage. There was a school beef on Monday, the kids told investigators. Tuesday was the shooting. School starts in 10 days and still no one has been charged.

Talk to the kids on this corner. They’ll tell you that standing at the bus stop can be tantamount to taking your life in your hands.

“I’m scared a lot of the time,” said Mikhale Stinson, 17, who was waiting on the No. 46 with her sister, Arkeshia Crippens, 15. It was only 4 o’clock. The sun was high. Still, the girls were keeping a wary eye. “The only thing more dangerous than the bus after school is waiting for the bus after school. The longer you’re standing still is the better chance that something bad is going to happen to you.”

The longer you’re standing still is the better chance that something bad is going to happen to you.

How do these girls muster the inner strength to learn at school, once they get there?  How many good kids stop going to classes because it is all too much, to get there, then get home?

Read the rest here.

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